x_los: (Alice)
Lot-1

This mug, guys. You could drink earl grey out of it. I am just saying. This is a rare prototype, worth £200 or some shit (though it didn't sell for that, so maybe not), but if you said the proper run was £5 on ebay... I could find myself tempted.

Yesterday I bent the wire whisk of my kitchenaid on some frozen butter whilst trying to make oatmeal cookies as a way of bribing a boss I don't like into hiring me for more freelance contracts. I then *actually cried* over having broken this treasure possession, not having used it enough, how much it HURT to bend it back into shape, and the passing of all worldly things, especially anything I particularly love. Because that is the level of HYPER-EMO I reach when furious with myself. It's like, a film!Loki-level of self-pity.

I also cursed my stupidity for having not used the paddle attachment, or realized that just because the floor mixer at the bakery could handle frozen butter, that didn't mean my beloved Kitchenaid could. I *think* it's back to near-perfect working order again--though it looks sliiightly wonky--and I could buy a new whisk for a not insignificant but reasonable cost. But these are the sort of thoughts I have now, when the emo has passed over us. At the time I cradled a whisk to my chest like a baby for no less than half an hour. Yep. *Maturity*.

Also, has anyone ever beheld the work of Clarice Cliff? Because it is the UGLIEST SHIT KNOWN TO HUMANITY. Seriously, what the hell is this? There is literally none of it I wouldn't bin, and I can see *exactly* how much it's worth. It would simply be a service to people with eyes.

today: )

MUSIC and Links )
x_los: (Enterprise!Sherlock)
TRIGGER WARNING FOR SOME QUASI-ACADEMIC DISCUSSION OF SEXUAL ASSAULT.

WARNING: I finished this at 3am and I'm sure it's rambling and mad, but will edit later. When less... headed to bed.

**EDIT** Cleaned it up a little now, so all shitiness is my own.

On Horatio Hornblower (the Hornblower series), Jean Luc Picard (Star Trek), the Fifth Doctor (Doctor Who) and Kerr Avon (Blakes 7). )
x_los: (Russian Church)
We were supposed to see Matilda in Seven-Dails-But-Not-The-Donmar-So-God-Knows-Where-This-Venue-Is tomorrow night, but they canceled it without warning us. They let us reschedule, but didn't email, apologize, or *offer* to reschedule us. Katy had to call them up to arrange things; she only knew something was amiss by looking at her credit card receipt. I am 80% sure that was an appropriate semi-colon use...

Last night in fit of madness asked Miles Richardson whether he was in an Innocent orange juice commercial that sounded suspiciously familiar. We'll see how *that* goes. Said something like 'Orange you in this? *link*' Love and hate self in equal measure. Not sorry.

An recommended these: http://thestonesoup.com/blog/2010/04/when-irish-eyes-are-smiling-little-baileys-cheesecakes-5-ingredients-10-minutes/ , and they sound v. nice. So did her other rec: http://www.verybestbaking.com/recipes/32364/Old-Fashioned-Soft-Pumpkin-Cookies/detail.aspx , but getting tinned pumpkin in the UK can be an annoyance.

I'm really enjoying this EP right now:



Recently just in the course of doing chores, and in an attempt on Sunday to have an actual 'day off' with Katy (didn't *really* work), I've been watching a lot of television.

Stuff I am into at the moment:

- Rewatching the old Our Mutual Friend with Paul McGann's Ridiculous Mustache. I mustache you not to laugh at it, it is a very serious facial hair statement. I love a good Dickensy funtime.
- Downton Abbey, which I recently found myself defending vociferously against charges that it was the opiate of the masses right before going 'wait WHAT, self?' I did not know I cared!
- Merlin, which has stolen Who's goodness with MAGIC!! or something in order to produce shockingly competent television, after having been in a slump for a good portion of last year. I'm pretty suspicious about last ep and don't know whether to take its Big Event as permanent, given the forces in play this series.
- Star Trek: Next Generation: Katy and I's rewatch has cleared mid Season Six, after stalling for like a week due to my unwillingness to watch horrible horrible shit happen to Picard. The ep wasn't quite as AWFUL as my childhood had painted it, and I think I built it up enough for Katy consequently to deaden the blow for her, which is for the best as Benny has, as Katy pointed out, filled our Reptile Empire Gratuitously Torturing Our Hero quota for all time. Chain of Command Part II is a successful and not, I think, unnecessary story about torture, in an Orwellian/1984 kind of way, but I sort of feel its messages lodged in me the first time I saw it and now its content seems a bit 'oh', not through any fault of its own.
- Sarah Jane Adventures: This series strong as usual. Quite sad I'll never learn more about The Captain, the best parrot!regeneration of a TL that ever there was. Also I want Luke and his new sister to bond properly, but I guess there's not any time.
- Top Hat: it's an old Fred Astaire/Ginger Rogers movie that was on iplayer while I was making my marinade and doing dishes last night, and I don't know that I'd ever even him in anything before. Not quite finished, but so far rather clever and funny at points. Good random Gertrude Stein joke. Hate her writing. Three Lives destroyed my own will to liiiive. Is her Italian fashion designer friend supposed to be gay? If so, surprised they went there. If not, some of the jokes make less sense.

how to make vats of barbacoa pork, and other adventures )
x_los: (Spock Tires Of Your Bullshit.)
I am VERY TIRED. Still drained from the latest bout of illness, and not a little exhausted by my Pre-Guest Cleaning (girlfriend comes Sunday--I'm excited, a touch nervous, and frantically tidying things) and running around tonight, despite my ingestion of a 1) Java Monster, and 2) Caramel Mocha Chiller (tm, Sonic). Neither of which made me feel as if I had live hamsters who'd just been bitten by cocaine-addicted scorpions surging through my very veins, despite the adverts' implications and my own over-enthusiastic expectations. Energy drinks of the world: where are my hamsters with second hand substance abuse issues? Where?

ON TO THE SCI-FI RAMBLING.

Like everyone else in the world, the popular resurgence of Star Trek has drawn me back to my stream of origin a sci-fi salmon. In the past weeks I've managed to re-watch nearly all of ST:TOS.

It always bothers me that Other Planets have monolithic cultures, as if cultural globalization has just swallowed them as part of their evolutionary process. Initially, I assume a vastly alien culture would appear uniform by virtue of the great differences that must exist between products of entirely disparate cultural origins. But as we get to know a species over centuries, shouldn't some distinction become apparent between, say, Vulcans from different hemispheres? Betazoids of different religions?

Re: Vulcans, it sometimes seems as if we only ever come in contact with members of the highest class. In the original series we see Spock's marriage: hyper-traditional and redolent of privilege. In the later-made and earlier-set Enterprise we see another much like it.

Star Trek is big on advanced societies being inherently classless. Whether or not this is naive, and if wealth might be supplanted as the basis of such a hierarchical system by privilege based on traditional prerogatives, what might be seen as a meritocracy, or a valuation based on an individual or family's perceived contribution to society, can be laid aside for now. Suffice it to say that kibbutzniks traditionally wield a numerically disproportionate political power in the Israeli Knesset, as do Ashkenazim in Israeli politics, without the benefit of necessarily being more monied--so there's certainly precedent.

The Western perception of Japan is that everyone knows how to run a tea ceremony and cavorts with geishas. These are historically very upper-class activities, built around having the leisure time necessary to develop and devote to them. Vulcan attitudes and mental disciplines (meditation, philosophical education, occasional retreats into monasticism), at least according to human historical tradition, smack of the money necessary to devote to a fetishization of an ironically complicated scholasticism-cum-Buddhist-esque simplicity.

Also, there could be a wicked underlying complacency to stoicism--its easier to be untroubled, to consider emotional outbursts gauche, if you're entitled enough to make most worry unnecessary?

As this culture progressed, did identifiable upper class behaviors become the signifiers of Vulcan-ness? There's something disquieting about the loss of those other classes' cultural identities, even as the loss of ethnic identities is a sad end to what we have to assume was initially a plurality of experiences. The ways and views of the middle and lower classes seem to have been lost, either as these classes gained the resources that enabled mobility and imitative behavior (or is this romanticizing their difficulties?), in some reaction to contact with the larger galaxy, or by virtue of a wholesale trend towards homoginization.

This always bothers me about Doctor Who, as well, re: the 'Gallifreyans' vs. 'Time Lords' nomenclature thing. I have to say I much prefer it if the appellation 'Time Lord' is synonymous with 'Gallifreyan,' rather than handed out only to Academy graduates, nobles, or the somehow /specially/ intellectually gifted in Gallifreyan society. I think I find the Doctor running away from a species-wide elitism more resonant? I want 'Come now, we're both Time Lords' to be a call to something more fundamental and significant than 'help a brother out, we both went to Eton.' My general squick's more complicated than that, but I'm not sure how to parse and articulate it. I just wholesale /prefer/ 'Time Lord' simply meaning Gallifreyan.

Spock's class status is revealed rather slowly--we learn that he's from a /very/ well-placed family only in second season's Amok Time when Kirk and McCoy notice that a reactionary Vulcan politician of interplanetary renown is officiating at Spock's wedding, and comment on it. Spock's in no position at that point to observe or react to their surprise. Later we meet a prominent Vulcan ambassador, and Kirk is surprised that the ambassador and his human wife are Spock's parents. It's interesting that Spock's human mother and Nurse Chapel both imply that for all the touted superiority of their emotional stoicism, Vulcans have some expectations of submissiveness from their wives that humans typically find sexist or strange. This isn't mentioned again in later encounters with the species, perhaps thought better of by later writers.

From a social sciences perspective, the dragging out the 'tortured half-breed' trope with Spock's a bit of a backward-looking step from a show that so wanted to be progressive.

As a parting non sequitur, I'm so, so tired of chasing bats out of the kitchen. This is like the fourth this summer? We have to be /doing/ something different to attract them, or their diminishing habitat is pushing them further into the city than I've ever seen. But screw environmental worries: damn bats! All up in my kitchen! Confounding the Schnoodle! ...I'm sorry, I have to go now and found a prog rock group, 'Confounding the Schnoodle.' Excuse me. I'll be back later. With Grammies.
x_los: (Spock Tires Of Your Bullshit.)
I am VERY TIRED. Still drained from the latest bout of illness, and not a little exhausted by my Pre-Guest Cleaning (girlfriend comes Sunday--I'm excited, a touch nervous, and frantically tidying things) and running around tonight, despite my ingestion of a 1) Java Monster, and 2) Caramel Mocha Chiller (tm, Sonic). Neither of which made me feel as if I had live hamsters who'd just been bitten by cocaine-addicted scorpions surging through my very veins, despite the adverts' implications and my own over-enthusiastic expectations. Energy drinks of the world: where are my hamsters with second hand substance abuse issues? Where?

ON TO THE SCI-FI RAMBLING.

Like everyone else in the world, the popular resurgence of Star Trek has drawn me back to my stream of origin a sci-fi salmon. In the past weeks I've managed to re-watch nearly all of ST:TOS.

It always bothers me that Other Planets have monolithic cultures, as if cultural globalization has just swallowed them as part of their evolutionary process. Initially, I assume a vastly alien culture would appear uniform by virtue of the great differences that must exist between products of entirely disparate cultural origins. But as we get to know a species over centuries, shouldn't some distinction become apparent between, say, Vulcans from different hemispheres? Betazoids of different religions?

Re: Vulcans, it sometimes seems as if we only ever come in contact with members of the highest class. In the original series we see Spock's marriage: hyper-traditional and redolent of privilege. In the later-made and earlier-set Enterprise we see another much like it.

Star Trek is big on advanced societies being inherently classless. Whether or not this is naive, and if wealth might be supplanted as the basis of such a hierarchical system by privilege based on traditional prerogatives, what might be seen as a meritocracy, or a valuation based on an individual or family's perceived contribution to society, can be laid aside for now. Suffice it to say that kibbutzniks traditionally wield a numerically disproportionate political power in the Israeli Knesset, as do Ashkenazim in Israeli politics, without the benefit of necessarily being more monied--so there's certainly precedent.

The Western perception of Japan is that everyone knows how to run a tea ceremony and cavorts with geishas. These are historically very upper-class activities, built around having the leisure time necessary to develop and devote to them. Vulcan attitudes and mental disciplines (meditation, philosophical education, occasional retreats into monasticism), at least according to human historical tradition, smack of the money necessary to devote to a fetishization of an ironically complicated scholasticism-cum-Buddhist-esque simplicity.

Also, there could be a wicked underlying complacency to stoicism--its easier to be untroubled, to consider emotional outbursts gauche, if you're entitled enough to make most worry unnecessary?

As this culture progressed, did identifiable upper class behaviors become the signifiers of Vulcan-ness? There's something disquieting about the loss of those other classes' cultural identities, even as the loss of ethnic identities is a sad end to what we have to assume was initially a plurality of experiences. The ways and views of the middle and lower classes seem to have been lost, either as these classes gained the resources that enabled mobility and imitative behavior (or is this romanticizing their difficulties?), in some reaction to contact with the larger galaxy, or by virtue of a wholesale trend towards homoginization.

This always bothers me about Doctor Who, as well, re: the 'Gallifreyans' vs. 'Time Lords' nomenclature thing. I have to say I much prefer it if the appellation 'Time Lord' is synonymous with 'Gallifreyan,' rather than handed out only to Academy graduates, nobles, or the somehow /specially/ intellectually gifted in Gallifreyan society. I think I find the Doctor running away from a species-wide elitism more resonant? I want 'Come now, we're both Time Lords' to be a call to something more fundamental and significant than 'help a brother out, we both went to Eton.' My general squick's more complicated than that, but I'm not sure how to parse and articulate it. I just wholesale /prefer/ 'Time Lord' simply meaning Gallifreyan.

Spock's class status is revealed rather slowly--we learn that he's from a /very/ well-placed family only in second season's Amok Time when Kirk and McCoy notice that a reactionary Vulcan politician of interplanetary renown is officiating at Spock's wedding, and comment on it. Spock's in no position at that point to observe or react to their surprise. Later we meet a prominent Vulcan ambassador, and Kirk is surprised that the ambassador and his human wife are Spock's parents. It's interesting that Spock's human mother and Nurse Chapel both imply that for all the touted superiority of their emotional stoicism, Vulcans have some expectations of submissiveness from their wives that humans typically find sexist or strange. This isn't mentioned again in later encounters with the species, perhaps thought better of by later writers.

From a social sciences perspective, the dragging out the 'tortured half-breed' trope with Spock's a bit of a backward-looking step from a show that so wanted to be progressive.

As a parting non sequitur, I'm so, so tired of chasing bats out of the kitchen. This is like the fourth this summer? We have to be /doing/ something different to attract them, or their diminishing habitat is pushing them further into the city than I've ever seen. But screw environmental worries: damn bats! All up in my kitchen! Confounding the Schnoodle! ...I'm sorry, I have to go now and found a prog rock group, 'Confounding the Schnoodle.' Excuse me. I'll be back later. With Grammies.

Profile

x_los: (Default)
x_los

October 2012

S M T W T F S
 12 3456
78910111213
14 151617181920
21222324 25 2627
2829 3031   

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags