x_los: (Russian Church)
Badger was over all weekend. Watched most of A:EMH S1, which largely holds up on rewatch. Never sure if Wakanda is doing something cool in imagining an isolationist G8-bitch-slapping world-power African nation that challenges viewers' basic colonialist assumptions, or if Wakanda is simply a weird amalgam of African stereotypes that's simultaneously doing positive and racist things. I think a bit of both, though obviously the second possibility sort of admits the first.

Lost a lot of games, which disappoints me a bit. Normally Katy and I do about equally well, and this weekend we did about equally poorly, both in Carcassone and Tigris and Euphrates. Kind of want to play a game I know I'm fine at to regain mojo and feel generally better. Haven't won anything since Trivial Pursuit like two weeks ago, I don't think, despite since playing 3 games of Carcassone, a game of London, and a game of T&E. This is unusual and more annoying than it should be, given am grown ass woman and, like Dar Williams says, cooler than this. Wish I were generally less twitchy and neurotic about feeling dumb. On the plus side, getting more used to T&E, and may not actually hate it! Still don't know about that Caylus (the game, not the founder of the Klingon warrior code). It seems crap, but might /not/ be, if we played with an additional person.

Cleaned up all the lingering photos on my computer, deleted what I didn't need, and popped anything potentially relevant onto fb. If by relevant you mean 'a picture of Sasa looking unspeakable stupid'.

Made pizzas with Robin. She did nice bases, but must remember these take longer to cook through than plain Morrisons cardboard wafers, and as such need like 18 min, perhaps. Also made meatloaf with roastinis and optional mushroom gravy on the side, combining Nigella's technique with the Joy of Cooking 'making it actually taste of anything'. For Nigella's bacon wrap, I have GOT to remember to use more bacon than I did, and to actually swaddle it around the sides/top it generously, so things don't curl up in this niggardly fashion.

Today I applied for like 6 McDonald's level food service jobs. Modified my food!CV and wrote individual cover letters. Created a profile on a childcare site and addressed a question to a specific job-poster. Doing half and half hours-long academic admin and quicker basic NEED SOME MONEY TO LIVE!! job aps now.

Also finished edits for P4 and asked Katy to shift scenes around according to her editoral whim. Reading it through tomorrow, so she can do the same, I can make last changes, and hopefully we can have the draft out to people late Monday night, so they'll have some time/two days before the readthrough to look it over.

Showed the house Friday and today. Have another person tomorrow. Put up everything possible for ebay free listings. Cleaned the hell out of the house Friday, and did some more today.

I listened to all the music mock-ups the composing staff have done for the radio plays last night, and some of it was awesomely good. One of the main character themes sounds sooomewhat like American McGee's Alice's soundtrack. I'm on the whole really impressed with the professionalism, and with the sort of--reality of the project? Composers!! We met with them, I gave feedback, they worked MAGIC!! with scores and bullshit, I gave feedback, music baby was formed. It's part power and also like, part kind of--awe? It's a fanproject, I know, but there's something awesome
about like, a total thing coming together, and being made where there was nothing, and developing it cradle to grave.

Wrote people about council tax, job ap writing (the QM job centre), the Jubilee event (which Cambridge House no longer wants to do, so I'm left with THREE WEEKS to hook up with other people, plan my own from scratch, or find something else good to go to--thanks a /lot/, guys), book requests for Tor, the music, upcoming social plans, etc. Updated calendar and flatmates spreadsheet, cleaned out emails, etc. Kind of productive weekend despite the heavy social aspect.
x_los: (Japanese Pretty)
[livejournal.com profile] black_rider  poster this NPR link, which made me remember what a great photographer Steve McCurry (the man who took the famous National Geographic photo 'Afghan Girl') is. I've been on a trawl through his stuff, and there's some gorgeous ones below. If you have an awesome photo to drop in the comments, please, be my guest!

lovely  )


Though, divorced from context, do gorgeous photos of strange places count as exoticism? :/ Surely it's better to engage with the beauty of places I'll probably never get to see. I did think it a bit weird when, trawling through google images, I found a lot of American chicks posting self-portraits avec shawls after Afghan Girl. There's something disconcerting about their department store shawls and limp expressions, which compare so unfavorably with the startling, somewhat terrifying intensity of the eyes of the original subject. And it's odd (possibly appropriation?) to take a famous photo of Sharbat Gula, a prematurely-old twelve year old war refugee, "a symbol both of the 1980s Afghan conflict and of the refugee situation worldwide," as Wikipedia puts it, and... do it as unironic self-portraiture? With no real reference to the content of the original?

x_los: (Japanese Pretty)
[livejournal.com profile] black_rider  poster this NPR link, which made me remember what a great photographer Steve McCurry (the man who took the famous National Geographic photo 'Afghan Girl') is. I've been on a trawl through his stuff, and there's some gorgeous ones below. If you have an awesome photo to drop in the comments, please, be my guest!

lovely  )


Though, divorced from context, do gorgeous photos of strange places count as exoticism? :/ Surely it's better to engage with the beauty of places I'll probably never get to see. I did think it a bit weird when, trawling through google images, I found a lot of American chicks posting self-portraits avec shawls after Afghan Girl. There's something disconcerting about their department store shawls and limp expressions, which compare so unfavorably with the startling, somewhat terrifying intensity of the eyes of the original subject. And it's odd (possibly appropriation?) to take a famous photo of Sharbat Gula, a prematurely-old twelve year old war refugee, "a symbol both of the 1980s Afghan conflict and of the refugee situation worldwide," as Wikipedia puts it, and... do it as unironic self-portraiture? With no real reference to the content of the original?

x_los: (Make a Note.)
I'll tell you all later what I've gotten up to in New York, but packing at the moment. Have Intriguing London Links to celebrate my arriving at 8 am tomorrow and (hopefully) clearing customs, about which I am unreasonably terrified. ...probably because I actually am doing something slightly shady. IF YOU HAVE YOUR OWN awesome London links, sites or recommendations, please do drop me a comment, and I will be as happy to include them in the general list as I will be to take you up on your suggestions.

London's Finest Bookshops -- a really good, contributory Guardian listing that doesn't seek to limit excellence to the London parallel of NewYork's 'the Strand,' or the equivalent of City Lights/Prairie Lights, all of which is what I was initially looking for.

London's Best Cheesemongers
-- Time Out does a good Best of London culling generally, but this is clearly the greatest love of all. I mean. Cheese.

Shady Old Lady
-- A user-edited selection of weird sites and sights about town, and potential routes for self-guided tours thereof. Occasionally dumb, often pretty great.

Derelict London -- I'm really drawn to the uncanny beauty of decaying urban architecture, and Derelict London is a good guide. What is /could/ use is better web design (which is odd considering the site is associated with a glossy, well-turned-out published book), more sensible organization as a whole, and better commentary, in terms of the history of the sites depicted, where to find them, and more essayistic content. That aside, it seems an invaluable resource for exhaustive documentation of the city, as thorough as the Wayback Machine.

Disused Stations on the London Underground -- Another case of Big Name, Book-Affiliated Website Apparently Designed With Geocities. The organization's maddening, but it's a potentially fascinating guide to extra-legally exploring the historic London underground beyond the currently-operating 287 stations. There's often interesting alternate histories for the Ghost Stations, which are eerie and intriguing in their own right. Certain platforms and tunnels were used as bunkers and secret records storage in WWII, chosen for their ability to outlast a more complete blitz which would have razed the upper city. Lurking along the lines, you can find 19th century relics of the fierce competition of the privatized-undergrounds era that predated the triumph of the modern, unified civic tube. The closed British Museum stop is supposedly haunted by the pissed off ghost of an appropriated Egyptian mummy, and the newspaper company that offered a hefty reward to anyone willing to spend the night on the all-too-readily closed platform never had to award that prize.

I'm thinking of doing a larger project, tentatively based on this sort of thing, the two or three existing, seemingly lackluster books on the tube's history and a Village Voice article from a few years ago on the character of the infrequently visited final stops of all the major New York lines.  I'll let you know if anything materializes.

Adult Travelcard -- For everyone that bitches about how the tube is soooooo expeeeensive, omg, doesn't this look relatively comparable to the MTA bulk unlimited passes?
x_los: (Make a Note.)
I'll tell you all later what I've gotten up to in New York, but packing at the moment. Have Intriguing London Links to celebrate my arriving at 8 am tomorrow and (hopefully) clearing customs, about which I am unreasonably terrified. ...probably because I actually am doing something slightly shady. IF YOU HAVE YOUR OWN awesome London links, sites or recommendations, please do drop me a comment, and I will be as happy to include them in the general list as I will be to take you up on your suggestions.

London's Finest Bookshops -- a really good, contributory Guardian listing that doesn't seek to limit excellence to the London parallel of NewYork's 'the Strand,' or the equivalent of City Lights/Prairie Lights, all of which is what I was initially looking for.

London's Best Cheesemongers
-- Time Out does a good Best of London culling generally, but this is clearly the greatest love of all. I mean. Cheese.

Shady Old Lady
-- A user-edited selection of weird sites and sights about town, and potential routes for self-guided tours thereof. Occasionally dumb, often pretty great.

Derelict London -- I'm really drawn to the uncanny beauty of decaying urban architecture, and Derelict London is a good guide. What is /could/ use is better web design (which is odd considering the site is associated with a glossy, well-turned-out published book), more sensible organization as a whole, and better commentary, in terms of the history of the sites depicted, where to find them, and more essayistic content. That aside, it seems an invaluable resource for exhaustive documentation of the city, as thorough as the Wayback Machine.

Disused Stations on the London Underground -- Another case of Big Name, Book-Affiliated Website Apparently Designed With Geocities. The organization's maddening, but it's a potentially fascinating guide to extra-legally exploring the historic London underground beyond the currently-operating 287 stations. There's often interesting alternate histories for the Ghost Stations, which are eerie and intriguing in their own right. Certain platforms and tunnels were used as bunkers and secret records storage in WWII, chosen for their ability to outlast a more complete blitz which would have razed the upper city. Lurking along the lines, you can find 19th century relics of the fierce competition of the privatized-undergrounds era that predated the triumph of the modern, unified civic tube. The closed British Museum stop is supposedly haunted by the pissed off ghost of an appropriated Egyptian mummy, and the newspaper company that offered a hefty reward to anyone willing to spend the night on the all-too-readily closed platform never had to award that prize.

I'm thinking of doing a larger project, tentatively based on this sort of thing, the two or three existing, seemingly lackluster books on the tube's history and a Village Voice article from a few years ago on the character of the infrequently visited final stops of all the major New York lines.  I'll let you know if anything materializes.

Adult Travelcard -- For everyone that bitches about how the tube is soooooo expeeeensive, omg, doesn't this look relatively comparable to the MTA bulk unlimited passes?

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